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Author Topic: an Accurate Endeavour  (Read 5664 times)

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an Accurate Endeavour
« on: May 22, 2007, 01:33:44 AM »
This is Endeavour in redwood.  Hard to notice because of the flash glare is the retractable keel and the undercut transom.  These are two areas that the Chinese half models rarely get right.



« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 08:00:00 AM by magus »
Derbusa

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an Accurate Endeavour
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2007, 05:14:13 AM »
Nicely done, looks good :)
The Redwood definitly makes it a showpiece. I like the grain through out down to the keel

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an Accurate Endeavour
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2007, 05:19:06 AM »
Derbusa

Does the keel actually retract on the model and what do the Chinese not get right in the detail?
And remember to post - it's your community! You don't have to be an expert to offer a comment. :)

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an Accurate Endeavour
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2007, 09:29:25 AM »
The model is actually off set 1/4 inch off the face of the back plate and so the keel does retract.  Many of the J's had a severly undercut transom which did not show up in many of the photos of the day.  The Chinese mass modelers simply put on a rounded stern rather than deal with the undercut transom

This is a typical stern of a Chinese model claiming to be a J boat.



This is the stern of a Chinese model that I reconstructed to be a more accurate of the undercut transom of an authentic  J boat.

Derbusa

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an Accurate Endeavour
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2007, 11:08:09 PM »
Yeah I can see the difference.

This clip of rhe stern and transom gives a slightly different angle I believe to be same boat shows the sharp rise and "stretching" %-6 of the hull.


This hull shape allows a long overall length for teriffic sail area, wirh a very short waterline length, dors it not?

Is the hull shape the deciding factor for J class?
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an Accurate Endeavour
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2007, 09:25:58 AM »
The rule for J class was a simple LWL to sail area formula.  A 80 ft. LWL got the max 7583 sq ft sail and a 86 LWL got the minimum 7750 square ft of sail.  The extended sharp bow and reverse transom gave a length overall from about 120 to 133 feet and a beam about 19 to 22 ft.  The Transom was simply to extend the waterline length undersail.  Sail area was limited to7750 to 7583 square feet

There was also a K class at 65 feet LWL
Derbusa

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an Accurate Endeavour
« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2007, 05:10:13 AM »
Well if LWL is the deciding factor for J Class then craft with great design that posses a large LOA definitly posses an advantage in larger sail area.

Of coirse without a good crew and helmsmanship this can all mean nothing

Is the Endeavour unique in its design or are there other boatswith the same hull?
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an Accurate Endeavour
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2007, 08:49:40 AM »
There were several J's built during the 1930's for Cup challenges and defense.  Most were eventually scraped due to neglect or need for materials during WW II.  Recently Endeavour II was launched.  A modern copy of the original
Derbusa

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an Accurate Endeavour
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2007, 06:21:57 AM »
This is the definition of the J class rule from the J class association web site
"1929 to 1939
Previously, British yachts had raced under the International Rule, a rule that gave an advantage to bermudan rigged yachts, but which was restrictive for boats bigger than 48ft. The Americans wanted to race bigger boats and so introduced the Universal Rule in 1930. Within this rule the size of a yacht was determined (by waterline length) and this was shown as an alphabetical list . "J" signified yachts with a waterline length of between 75 to 87 feet. With the addition of the new design Bermuda mast, rigging and sail plan, nothing so large and 'awesome' had been built previously.

The rule was based on ideas proposed by Nat Herreshoff allowing waterline length to be increased without sail area being restricted, as it had been under the International Rule. This was compensated by a larger displacement and so draught was limited to 15ft. The J-Class were the foremost designs under this rule which defined the size with a new formula:

Waterline: 79' - 87'
Overall length: 120' plus
Displacement: up to 160 Tons

Several existing large British yachts, ‘Astra’, ‘Candida’, ‘White Heather II’ and ‘Britannia’, were converted to comply with the rule and raced alongside the J's. Of the true J-Class, only ten were ever built (4 in the UK and 6 in USA) and these raced together for just eight seasons from 1930 to 1937.
"
http://www.jclassyachts.com/history.html
« Last Edit: October 28, 2007, 11:55:03 AM by magus »
Derbusa

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an Accurate Endeavour
« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2007, 12:00:30 AM »
It is interesting to see that the  American Model Yachting Association has a class to faithfully reproduce the J.

J class yachts

The J class yachts are 1/16 scale versions of the original 1930's J-boats only, making it the largest of all the RC yachts. These classic yachts recreate the style of yachting's Golden Era, on a grand but affordable scale.
Approx. 85-101+" long.  Go to J Class page.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2007, 12:04:30 PM by magus »
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Re: an Accurate Endeavour
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2007, 01:45:13 AM »
My first half sailing boat was the famous Endeavour. I had only some information about the deck and a sight of starboard.


With an electric saw, I cut several silhouettes and before I glued them together, I then painted the surfaces with a color wash.


Layering the silhouettes gives a nice accentuating longitudinal lines on the model

An Endeavour of solid wood.

Endeavour in 1934

Please come and visit more of my Half Hulls at my website.

« Last Edit: November 08, 2007, 01:53:11 AM by oliveira »