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Author Topic: Brigantine Niagara  (Read 2828 times)

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Brigantine Niagara
« on: June 07, 2007, 03:26:15 AM »
Brigantine Niagara

Brigantine Niagara was built at Presque Isle, Pennsylvania, by Adam and Noah Brown under the supervision of Sailing Master Daniel Dobbins and Captain Oliver Hazard Perry, and was launched early in the summer of 1813.


Niagara and the other ships of Perry's squadron were held at Erie both by British blockade and lack of crews, until 1 August, when the British squadron retired. Taken over Erie's protective bar by ingenious use of camels, Niagara reached deep water 5 August, and four days later her commanding officer, Captain Jesse D. Elliott, arrived with some 100 officers and men to take command. The squadron sailed in search of the British 12 August, located it in the mouth of the Detroit River, and waited for its sortie.



Battle was given 10 September, Perry in Lawrence leading the attack, and drawing concentrated fire from the British until Lawrence became an unmanageable wreck. He then transferred to Niagara which had not closed the enemy in the earlier stages of the action. Elliot had resented Perry being in a position of command, and speculation is he withheld Niagara from the action not so accidentally. When Perry arrived on Niagara, he gave a terrified Elliott a dressing down, and took command and resumed the attack. From her deck he regrouped his squadron and came down through the enemy line, Niagara pouring broadsides into the British ships until victory was secured, and with it control of Lake Erie, freeing the upper lakes from the threat of invasion.


Niagara covered the landings at the mouth of the Detroit River which captured Malden 23 September, then covered the Army's advance up the Detroit to Lake St. Claire as they pursued the retreating British. After wintering at Erie, she returned to patrol and convoy operations which included the capture of British ships Mink, Nancy, Perseverance, and Batteau. She wintered at Erie once more in 1814, then served as receiving ship there until sunk in Misery Bay for preservation in 1820.

« Last Edit: October 28, 2007, 12:21:50 PM by magus »
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Brigantine Niagara
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2007, 10:53:39 PM »

The US Brig Niagara is inspected by the United States Coast Guard as a Sailing School Vessel. She has auxiliary propulsion engines and modern navigation equipment, but lacks modern amenities such as warm water, showers, and privacy. During the summer, she is sailed by a crew of 16 professionals, supplemented by 20 trainees willing to live onboard for a minimum of three weeks under Spartan conditions such as hammock berthing and living out of a duffel bag. During the winter she is maintained by five full-time staff and a corps of 50 to 100 volunteers from the Erie Region who donate maintenance hours, which are valued towards their tuition to sail as trainees during the summer

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« Last Edit: October 28, 2007, 12:24:33 PM by magus »
And remember to post - it's your community! You don't have to be an expert to offer a comment. :)